Category Archives: News

Adolescent health – vulnerable and under threat

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Fantastic to see the recent comment in The Lancet by Richard Horton calling on the UN agencies and funders to continue and improve their support of a comprehensive Global Adolescent Health Agenda.

Two of the new Youth Network Members of The Lancet Standing Commission on adolescent health and wellbeing have brought their voices to support his call and to appeal to all young people to join the conversation using#LancetYouth #ask4adolescents.

For more information and to get in touch with the youth network subscribe to our newsletter and contact us via email our email enquiries@adolescentsourfuture.com.

Environmental threats to youth health

The recent comment titled “Offline: Adolescent health – vulnerable and under threat” along with the viewpoint titled “Age of Adolescents” published in The Lancet have again brought focus to the critical need to address health and healthcare for adolescents. There is a need to move beyond previous haphazard approaches of looking at years of growth and development in order to translate knowledge into concrete action on the ground for adolescents.

By virtue of being born into or merely existing in today’s world, we involuntarily put ourselves under the constant threat of health risks. The simple and basic act of inhaling air is now linked with exposure to hazardous levels of particulate matter. From the food we eat to the health services we can or cannot receive – the question that arises is how much agency do we, as adolescents, have over shaping our own health trajectories?

South Africa’s water crisis is an example of how the phenomena such as the global water risk are no longer limited to probabilities of the future but have rather become lived realities of the present. Climatic events have the potential to further deepen the pre-existing disparities in health, accessibility, affordability and quality of healthcare. Addressing the unique health needs of adolescents and creating indices to understand the impact of external events should be of utmost priority not only in a rapidly changing physical environment but also importantly in the geo-political environment, especially within conflict and humanitarian settings.

With many political leaders refusing to acknowledge climate change, the environment has long been treated in isolation from other policy areas including health. There is a need for greater linkage between planetary change and the functioning of civil society. Adolescents today are at a higher risk of facing adverse health outcomes by virtue of inhabiting polluted spaces inherited from previous generations. This calls for policy making that incorporates the concerns of today’s adolescents to mitigate the intergenerational inequality of opportunity for this generation who are inheriting the world that has been wrecked by previous generations. It is essential then, to have effective youth voices and participation today more than ever.

“The advent of adolescent health has opened a door to young activists and professionals who are holding those in power accountable for their actions.” R Horton, The Lancet

The world is constantly changing but the systems that provide for the needs and requirements of adolescent health are not up keeping up. Young people’s voices are an essential part of making systems more accountable and responsive to their needs. Whether it is India’s air pollution or South Africa’s water crisis, environmental degradation has been accelerated by a lack of the required actions by government.

Apart from the forces of migration and environment that exacerbate intergenerational inequity, the digital wave is fast changing the supply as well as demand for healthcare services. The Lancet Standing Commission is addressing the intersection of such forces with adolescent health through continued efforts to create and strengthen adolescent health research. It is expected that the Commission’s new framework of including the voices of youth advocates linked to broader advocacy groups will enable young people to participate at the table for the  adolescent health agenda. This collaboration of researchers, scientists, policy makers and young advocates is focused on both strengthening multidisciplinary evidence and creating a global movement for adolescent health.

“Science can provide an important lever of evidence to accelerate political action.”  R Horton, The Lancet

The Lancet Standing Commission is providing a unique opportunity for young people to interrogate and interpret research, giving us the opportunity to translate and disseminate research and data to better inform advocacy and action measures. SD imageThe wish is to move beyond tokenistic notions of youth participation by empowering young voices to bridge the gap of unequal access to authoritative scientific knowledge and information.

By Surabhi Dogra, Lancet Standing Commission, Youth Network Member.

Call out for Youth Voices: You are the ones to represent yourselves

Adolescent health has long been a neglected territory, in terms of age – women and children have traditionally received more attention – and in terms of the health sector in general, which is often a neglected area of government investment. I grew up in South Western China, where excellent school performance is the first and only priority for most families, and the psychological and emotional needs of adolescents are consciously or unconsciously ignored by the gatekeepers and our society.

Personally, I have seen young people who drop out of school, being tempted into drugs. I have seen young people suffer from unwanted pregnancies because they did not have the education and knowledge about sexual and reproductive health or their rights. I have seen young people blindly follow internet messages and do harm to themselves. I have seen young people so desperate they want to commit suicide because they are not understood by their friends nor society. Adolescent health is not only a matter of ill health. It is an integrated system shaped by education, sociological inequalities, digital media, economics, access to health care and health knowledge. And most importantly it can be shaped by youth engagement.

It is exciting that The Lancet Standing Commission on adolescent health and wellbeing innovatively and experimentally engages young people in academic research and I am excited to be one of the youth network members, to share my stories, as well as contribute my own unique voice and curiosity freely. Anyone of us cannot fully represent all groups of young people, and we call upon all youth advocacy groups to join their voices to ours so we can represent you at the Lancet Standing Commission table.

SH imageIt is of vital importance that all adolescents speak up for themselves bravely and with ambition. Our generation is facing threats and challenges, and this is the time that we are going to make a change!

By Shanshan He, Lancet Standing Commission, Youth Network Member.

Children in a digital age

unicef

Do you remember the first time you went online?

Chances are you knew life before the internet. But for children and adolescents growing up online, life is unimaginable without it.

digita lageDigital technology has transformed the world we live in – disrupting entire industries and changing the social landscape. As the influence of digital technology – and especially the internet – has increased, the debate about its impact has grown louder: Is it a boon to humankind, offering unlimited opportunity for communication and commerce, learning and free expression? Or is it a threat to our way of life, undermining the social fabric, even the political order, and threatening our wellbeing?

This is an interesting debate, but essentially an academic one. Because for better or for worse, digital technology is a fact of our lives.

UNICEF’s latest report, The State of the World’s Children 2017: Children in a digital world examines the different ways digital technology is affecting children’s and adolescent’s lives and life chances, identifying dangers as well as opportunities.

 

Fast facts:

  • Youth (ages 15–24) are the most connected age group. Worldwide, 71% are online compared with 48% of the total population.
  • 29% of the world’s youth – 346 million – are not online.
  • Children are accessing the internet at increasingly younger ages. In some countries, children under 15 are as likely to use the internet as adults over 25.
  • Digital technologies are bringing opportunities for learning and education to children, especially in remote regions and during humanitarian crises.
  • African youth are the least connected, with around 3 out of 5 offline, compared to just 1 in 25 in Europe.
  • Approximately 56 per cent of all websites are in English and many children cannot find content they understand or that is culturally relevant.
  • There is a digital gender gap as well. In 2017, globally 12% more men than women used the internet. In India, less than one third of internet users are female.
  • More than 9 in 10 child sexual abuse URLs identified globally are hosted in five countries – Canada, France, the Netherlands, the Russian Federation and the United States.

One in three internet users worldwide is a child or adolescent, and young people are now the most connected of all age groups. From photos posted online to medical records stored in the cloud. Many children have a digital footprint before they can even walk or talk as a result of parents and/or family posting photos online.

Despite children’s massive online presence, too little is done to protect them from the perils of the digital world, says UNICEF’s latest report.

SOWC_2017_1_0_2_Infographic1_1000x380Digital technology can be a game changer for disadvantaged children, offering them new opportunities to learn, socialise and make their voices heard – or it can be yet another dividing line. Millions of children are left out of an increasingly connected world. As digital technology rapidly evolves, so can the risks children face online – from cyberbullying to misuse of their private information to online sexual abuse and exploitation.

As Ms Surabhi Dogra, a Youth Network Member of the Lancet Standing Commission on Adolescent Health and Wellbeing, comments.

“In the digital era, we as young people assume the identity of not only citizens but rather netizens (a user of the internet) of the digital world. As the report highlights, the inequities of society are now beginning to mirror themselves in the digital space. A glaring digital divide prevents children and adolescents from LMIC’s accessing the services of the internet like their counterparts from other parts of the world. Furthermore, the report also highlights how young females who may be battling the gender gap in their everyday lives also have to struggle to sustain a digital presence.

Digital technology carries immense potential to solve some of the developmental challenges faced by young people. On the other hand, the negative consequences of the digital wave threaten the privacy of young people who may not be equipped with levels of digital literacy necessary to assess as well as adopt measures of protection.”

In the report, UNICEF set out to uncover how the internet and digital technology are helping and hindering children’s learning, wellbeing and social relationships. The report makes a clear call to governments, the digital technology sector and telecom industries to level the digital playing field for children and adolescents by creating policies, practices and products that can help children and adolescents harness digital opportunities and protect them from harm.

“There is a need for moving towards the democratisation of the digital space while keeping the interests of an important part of the digital citizenry i.e. children and adolescents at the heart of policy making and implementation. The report’s recommendation on involving young stakeholders to voice their concerns and views about shaping their experience on the internet is critical. We as young people of the 21st century, should have a voice in shaping our realities in not only the physical but also the virtual world.”

Equally important, this report includes the perspectives of children and adolescents on the impact of digital technology in their lives – telling their own stories about the issues that most affect them. Hear their stories and learn about the urgent need to make the internet safer for children and adolescents while increasing access to digital technology for every child and adolescent, especially the most disadvantaged.

“For better and for worse, digital technology is now an irreversible fact of our lives,” said UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake. “In a digital world, our dual challenge is how to mitigate the harms while maximising the benefits of the internet for every child.”

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#GBVChat Twitter chat

Twitter chat: “Positive Steps to End Gender-Based Violence — in Education & with Education”

GBV chat

The USAID-funded YouthPower Learning project will host the fourth annual #GBVChat Twitter chat on December 6, 2017. Please join this global conversation from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET to discuss “Positive Steps to End Gender-Based Violence—in Education & with Education” as part of 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence and in support of USAID’s initiatives to end gender-based violence (GBV).

Sign up to support the #GBVChat and get an advance copy of the questions that will explore during the chat.

Follow #GBVChat and the GBVChat list on Twitter with @YPLearning on December 6.

#GBVCHat Schedule and topics

Time Organization On Twitter
8:00
a.m.
Prevention+  (Promundo-US, Sonke Gender Justice, and Rutgers): “Men and Women Ending Gender-Based Violence”  @Promundo_US
9:00
a.m.
YouthPower Learning and YouthPower Action: “Positive steps to end GBV: transforming gender norms through positive youth development”  @YPLearning
10:00
a.m.
The Asia Foundation: “Seeking justice for GBV survivors: The role of legal education and judicial training” @Asia_Foundation
11:00
a.m.
RTI International: “GBV in Education: Research to Practice” @RTI_INTL_DEV
12:00
p.m.
K4Health: “The effects of gender-based violence on reproductive health” @K4Health
1:00
p.m.
ICRW: “GBV and excluded, non-binary, youth populations” @ICRW
2:00
p.m.
Banyan Global: “Using education to change social norms around GBV”  @Banyan_Global
3:00
p.m.
Chemonics: “How to use and establish local systems to combat GBV within schools” @Chemonics
4:00
p.m.
USAID: “Addressing gender-based violence and health among children and youth” @USAIDGH

DCP3 Volume 8 launch

Dear Subscribers,

Apologies for the silence, The Lancet Commission on Adolescent Health and Wellbeing, is in a planning phase for the “Lancet Standing Commission”.  Stayed tuned – more to come in early 2018!

In the mean time, read below for an important event from our partners in Global Adolescent Health.  🙂

Vol 8 Cover ThumbnailDCP3 Volume 8 ‘Child and Adolescent Health and Development’ launch

Disease Control Priorities, 3rd Edition (DCP3) has been a 5 year collaborative effort involving more than 30 editors and more than 500 authors, many of whom you will know.  Volume 8 of the 9-volume series is entitled Child and Adolescent Health and Development, and explores the role of health in the development of human capital in poor countries. Further information on DCP3 and Volume 8, can be found here.

Key messages

  • It takes some 8000 days for a child to develop into an adult. Sensitive phases shape development throughout this period, and age-appropriate and condition-specific support is required throughout if a child is to achieve full potential as an adult.
  • Investment in health during the first 1000 days is widely recognised as a high priority, but investments are often neglected in the following 7000 days of middle childhood and adolescence. This neglect is also reflected in the investment in research on these age groups.
  • At least three phases are crucial to health and development during the next 7000 days, each requiring a condition-specific and age-specific response: middle childhood growth and consolidation phase (5–9 years) when infection and malnutrition remain key constraints on development, and mortality rates are higher than previously realised; adolescent growth spurt (10–14 years) when body mass increases rapidly and substantial physiological and behavioural changes associated with puberty occur; and adolescent growth and consolidation phase (15–19 years), which brings further brain restructuring, linked with exploration, experimentation, and initiation of behaviours that are lifelong determinants of health.
  • Broadening of investment in human development to include scalable interventions during the next 7000 days can be achieved cost-effectively. Two essential packages were identified: the first package addresses the needs in middle childhood and early adolescence through a school-based approach; the second focuses on older adolescents (15–19 years) through a mixed approach also involving the community, media and health systems. Both packages offer high cost-effectiveness and benefit-cost ratios.
  • Well designed health interventions in middle childhood and adolescence can leverage the current substantial investment in education, and improved design of educational programmes can improve health. The potential synergy between health and education is undervalued and the returns on co-investment are rarely optimised.

It is wonderful that many of the LancetYouth Commissioners were able to contribute to DCP3 Volume 8 – relevant chapters below.

1. Child and Adolescent Health and Development: Realizing Neglected Potential: Donald A. P. Bundy, Nilanthi de Silva, Susan Horton, George C. Patton, Linda Schultz, and Dean T. Jamison

5. Global Measures of Health Risks and Disease Burden in Adolescents: George C. Patton, Peter Azzopardi, Elissa Kennedy, Carolyn Coffey, and Ali Mokdad LINK

9. Puberty, Developmental Processes, and Health Interventions: Russell M. Viner, Nicholas B. Allen, and George C. Patton

11. Nutrition in Middle Childhood and Adolescence: Zohra Lassi, Anoosh Moin, and Zulfiqar Bhutta

18. Health and Disease in Adolescence: Nicola Reavley, George C. Patton, Susan M. Sawyer, Elissa Kennedy, and Peter Azzopardi

21. Platforms for Delivering Adolescent Health Actions: Susan M. Sawyer, Nicola Reavley, Chris Bonell, and George C. Patton

26. Identifying an Essential Package for Adolescent Health: Economic Analysis: Susan Horton, Elia De la Cruz Toledo, Jacqueline Mahon, John Santelli, and Jane Waldfogel

Research with Adolescents

Image for UNICEF event

 How to Do Research with Adolescents Living in Low- and Middle-Income countries?

When: Thursday, November 16th 2017

9:30 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. (EST)

About the webinar

Despite increasing focus on adolescent wellbeing globally, comprehensive data collection systems and research for effective interventions are lacking. Practitioners and policy-makers often ask, “How do we know what works?” and “How do we get this evidence?”

To assist with generating better evidence for adolescent programming and policy, in May, 2017, the UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti,  Columbia University, and members of the Lancet Commission on Adolescent Health and Wellbeing released a series of briefs on Conducting Research with Adolescents in Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

This webinar offers an overview of the briefs, focusing on what is unique about research with adolescents, best practices for working with them, and key knowledge gaps. It also provides an opportunity for discussion with the series editors, including: indicators and data sources, ethics, research with disadvantaged and vulnerable groups, participatory research, social and structural determinants, and adolescent economic strengthening interventions.

Speakers:

John Santelli, Professor, Population and Family Health, Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health and Lancet Commissioner

Nikola Balvin, Knowledge Management Specialist, Office of Research-Innocenti

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Youth Network Members

Introducing the newly appointed “Youth Network Members” for the Lancet Standing Commission on Adolescent Health and Wellbeing

Congratulations to the six “Youth Network Members”. We are thrilled to announce the six successful candidates to The Lancet Standing Commission’s Youth Network. As members of the Youth Network, over the next 6-9 months they will work with both youth commissioners from the 2016 Lancet Commission on Adolescent Health and Wellbeing (Dakshitha Wickremarathne and Kikelomo Taiwo-Idowu) to develop a plan for broad youth engagement with the Standing Commission. Additionally, they will engage with members of the Standing Commission in its work-plan

The Youth Network will work with the Standing Commission to take forward the work around the six recommendations from the 2016 Lancet Report. This included a recommendation about the importance of partnering with young people for their health.

Amanda Bosco

AB imageAmanda Bosco is a youth activist and human rights defender advocating for LGBTI rights, sexual and reproductive health rights. She is a peer educator for the Uganda Youth and Adolescents Health Forum where she reaches out to grassroot communities including young key populations. Amanda is a civic graduate of the Young African Leadership Initiative (YALI). She is also a volunteer with the youth coalition for sexual and reproductive Rights and the UN women informal reference group on LGBTI issues. Amanda is currently pursuing an undergraduate degree in Business administration and also working part-time at Transgender Equality Uganda as an advocacy officer.

Jordan Tewhaiti-Smith

JTS imageJordan Tewhaiti-Smith is currently a medical student from Martinborough, New Zealand who has a passion for Indigenous health, Māori health specifically. Since a young age, Jordan has realised a desire to change the health outcomes for his people and brings with him a network of Māori individuals all who stand for their own whānau (family), hapū (sub-tribe) and iwi (tribe). Jordan has a strong interest and belief in the effects of research on the health of communities, and has completed projects is the fields of Māori health (hauora), children’s health (tamariki ora), gang health and the health of young men (tāne ora). In his short time after finishing high school Jordan has worked with multiple organisations focusing on health and health workforce development these being Kia Ora Hauora (an organisation working with Māori youth to support them into health careers), the Māori Health Workforce Development Unit and the University of Otago. Jordan has represented Māori at key organisational events, most recently winning the Royal Australasian College of Physicians Indigenous Prize. Jordan is proud to now be representing Youth and Adolescent Health at an international level and this further supports his innate commitment to improving health for young people. Na reira, naku te rourou, nau te rourou ka ora ait e iwi (with your basket, and my basket, the people will live).

Mariam Naguib

Naguib_Mariam (3)Mariam Naguib is a medical student at the University of Toronto. She is interested in the intersection of health equity and human rights though the lens of systems thinking and advocacy. Her work has focused on health systems with her current work with the Munk School of Global Affairs on reaching the hardest to reach, her past work as a Junior Fellow for Engineers without Borders on water and sanitation and her work at McGill University on access to health care for refugee claimants in Canada. She seeks to empower youth through her efforts on restorative justice circles, and create ways to channel their passions with past coordination of the Amnesty International Human Rights College and in her everyday encounters. Mariam can be found navigating the power of Twitter, @mariammnaguib

Natasha Kaoma

IMG_9663-1Natasha Salifyanji Kaoma is an international sexual and reproductive health and rights advocate and Medical Doctor. She is passionate about the empowerment of youth, women and girls which promoted her to co-found Copper Rose Zambia, a youth-led organization that works with adolescents and women by providing sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) awareness, menstrual hygiene programs and economic empowerment. Natasha has over 8 years experiencing in advocacy for youth friendly services and SRHR awareness. She has been involved in the integration of family planning, SRHR and menstrual hygiene management in adolescent health programming. She serves as the Country Coordinator for the International Youth Alliance for Family Planning, is a member of the Youth Coalition on Sexual and Reproductive Rights, where she supports the inclusion of young people in policy making with regards to reproductive health. Natasha is a 2017 Queens Young Leaders award recipient, Zambian Women of the Year-Healthcare Champion, Local Pathways fellow, Royal Commonwealth Society Fellow, and an Alumnus of both the University of Delaware and University of Zambia. She is currently pursuing a qualification on Leading Change at Cambridge University, UK.

Shanshan He

SH imageShanshan is a young activist promoting adolescent and youth sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and rights. Volunteering for over 4 years in China Family Planning Association (CFPA), Shanshan was elected as the Alternate Youth Representative of IPPF ESEAOR, sits in the Regional Executive Committee, and represents ESEAOR in the Governing Council. She used to serve as the National Coordinator of Youth Peer Education Network (Y-PEER), supported by UNFPA. With the experience of coordinating with more than 200 universities and conducting peer to peer trainings, Shanshan works collaboratively with different organizations and youth groups. She is now leading China Youth Network (CYN), a first ever youth volunteer organization that undertakes peer education on SRH and advocates for SRH and rights for young people (aged 10 to 24) in China.

Surabhi Dogra

SD imageSurabhi Dogra is a budding development professional from India. At 16, she undertook a school-level UN MDG-5 project supported by UNICEF India and Bhutan, which fuelled her passion to delve into the discipline of public health.  She received the University of Delhi Gold Medal for her academic performance in her bachelors’ degree in Mass Communication. She completed her Master’s degree in Social Work in Public Health from the Tata Institute of Social Sciences where she received awards for best fieldwork and academic performance. Her Master’s Dissertation was focused on researching the impact of access to mHealth on maternal health. She hopes to synthesise her academic interests and visual communications training towards advancing the field of Health Communications in India. Her other areas of interest include mHealth, reproductive health, ICTs in development and youth advocacy and communications. Through her fieldwork experience and internships with organisations such as SEWA Bharat, YWCA and Tata Memorial Hospital, Surabhi has and continues to engage with adolescents across urban slum settings of Delhi and Mumbai as well as rural villages of Rajasthan and Maharashtra.  Surabhi enjoys capturing rural life through her lens in her spare time. She has also enjoyed exploring theatre as a form of expression for young people in the capacity of an actor, writer and director.

Youth, Peace and Security Report

4Youth are uniquely affected by humanitarian crises and conflict. The United Nations Security Council, on 9 December 2015, set a historical precedent by unanimously adopting a ground-breaking resolution on Youth, Peace and Security which recognises that “young people play an important and positive role in the maintenance and promotion of international peace and security”. This landmark resolution urges Member States to give youth a greater voice in decision-making at the local, national, regional and international levels.

Mandated by UNSC Resolution 2250, the UN Sustainable Development Solution Network – Youth Initiative (SDSN Youth), has released a thematic paper on ‘The Impacts of Climate Change on Youth, Peace and Security’. The paper focuses on countries in the Middle East and Africa. To reinforce the critical role of 1.1 billion youth in sustainable development globally, surveys and polls were launched in collaboration with the U-Report team at UNICEF. The paper explored the impacts of climate change on the security and development of youth in the Middle East and Sub-Saharan Africa.

The paper is an official supporting document of the Progress Study on Youth, Peace & Security mandated by United Nations Security Council Resolution 2250. The Progress Study will be submitted to the United Nations Security Council and General Assembly at the end of 2017.


Read the report


UNSCR 2250 (2015) identifies five key pillars for action: participation, protection, prevention, partnerships and disengagement and reintegration. This resolution urges Member States to give youth a greater voice in decision-making at the local, national, regional and international levels and to consider setting up mechanisms that would enable young people to participate meaningfully in peace processes.

UNSCR2250 - Pillars

Women Deliver Young Leaders Program

Dear Subscribers,

Young-Leader-Shareable-IIThe Women Deliver Young Leaders Program is now recruiting its next class of Young Leaders.

Started in 2010, the Young Leaders Program provides youth advocates with the training and resources necessary to extend their influence and actively shape the programs and policies that affect their lives. Currently comprised of 400 youth advocates from more than 100 countries, the new class of 300 new Young Leaders will join the program early 2018.

Young people between the ages of 15 and 28 from all countries are welcome to apply and you can access the application here. The application closes on 13 October, and the incoming class of Young Leaders will be selected and notified of their acceptance in December 2017.

As advocates for adolescent and young adult health, wellbeing, and rights, we encourage all young adults to apply. So spread the word about the Young Leaders Program with your friends, and colleagues.

If you need more information:

Get more details on the Young Leaders Program application process.
Visit the Women Deliver Youth Website.
Follow Women Deliver Youth on Twitter.
Follow the Young Leaders Program on Facebook.

Don’t miss out on this great opportunity!


APPLY HERE


Kind regards,

The LancetYouth team

Application closing soon

AHC_Coverart_twitter_2

Establishing a Youth Network for The Lancet Standing Commission on Adolescent Health and Wellbeing

Dear Subscribers,

We are looking for SIX young health advocates and/or professionals (18-29 years) from diverse backgrounds, to work with us to set up a Youth Network for The Lancet Standing Commission. This expression of interest (EoI) comes with an expectation (funding dependent) that those who setup the Youth Network will also have an ongoing role as a member of the Network.

Please share this EoI with your friends, colleagues and networks. Remember application close 5 PM AEST on Monday 21st AUG 2017.


APPLY HERE


We are seeking young leaders with experience in one or more of the following:

  • Advocacy or communication related to adolescent health and wellbeing.
  • Work (paid or voluntary) at a local, national or international level in an area related to adolescent health and wellbeing.
  • Work (paid or voluntary) for an organisation that has a national and/or international role in adolescent/youth health and wellbeing.
  • Work in a related area of practice (i.e. law, health, journalism, economics, education, research).

We hope that you will bring your own networks of young people, have experience with youth participation and youth leadership and an ability to communicate well in English (spoken and written).

To apply please provide:

  • A two-minute video application, on “how you would like to contribute to the Lancet Standing Commission”
  • A completed application
  • Your curriculum vitae

We expect that the majority of successful applicants will be between 18-24 years, however applicants up to 29 years are also encouraged to apply.

All applicants must have a valid passport with a minimum of 1 year until expiry.

We are particularly interested in the participation of young health advocates and professionals from low and middle income countries (LMIC). For that reason, priority will be given to applicants with origins from LMICs.

PLEASE COMPLETE THE APPLICATION BY 5 PM AEST ON 21st AUG 2017.


APPLY HERE


 

young-people-bm

 

Establishing a Youth Network

AHC_Coverart_twitter_2

Establishing a Youth Network for The Lancet Standing Commission on Adolescent Health and Wellbeing

The Lancet is establishing a Standing Commission to continue the work of The Lancet Commission on Adolescent Health and Wellbeing. The 2016 Commission report included recommendations for engaging and partnering with young people as agents for change. Over the past few weeks, we have been working with Dakshitha Wickremarathne and Kikelomo Taiwo-Idowu, our two youth commissioners from the first phase of The Lancet Commission, to develop a process to establish a youth network for The Lancet Standing Commission.

We are looking for SIX young health advocates and/or professionals (18-29 years) from diverse backgrounds, to work with us to set up a Youth Network for The Lancet Standing Commission. This expression of interest comes with an expectation (funding dependent) that those who set up the Youth Network will also have an ongoing role as a member of the Network.

Please share this expression of interest (EOI) with your friends, colleagues and networks.


APPLY HERE


We are seeking young leaders with experience in one or more of the following:

  • Advocacy or communication related to adolescent health and wellbeing.
  • Work (paid or voluntary) at a local, national or international level in an area related to adolescent health and wellbeing.
  • Work (paid or voluntary) for an organisation that has a national and/or international role in adolescent/youth health and wellbeing.
  • Work in a related area of practice (i.e. law, health, journalism, economics, education, research).

We hope that you will bring your own networks of young people, have experience with youth participation and youth leadership and an ability to communicate well in English (spoken and written).

To apply please provide:

  • A two-minute video application, on “how you would like to contribute to the Lancet Standing Commission”
  • A completed application
  • Your curriculum vitae

We expect that the majority of successful applicants will be between 18-24 years, however applicants up to 29 years are also encouraged to apply.

All applicants must have a valid passport with a minimum of 1 year until expiry.

We are particularly interested in the participation of young health advocates and professionals from low and middle income countries (LMIC). For that reason, priority will be given to applicants with origins from LMICs.

PLEASE COMPLETE THE APPLICATION BY 5 PM AEST ON 21st AUG 2017.


APPLY HERE


this-generation

 

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